Category Archives: Editorial Design

Ad for Still Magazine's new website

This has to be my favorite magazine ad I’ve ever designed. Why? Because I had a vision,  sketched it out and communicated it to the photographer. It came together exactly how I planned. That may sound easy, but it’s not always.

The goal was to portray simply, that the print-only publication is now going to be online for the first time ever! I sketched a stack of magazines with 3-d ‘WWW’ on top of them. I then presented my idea to Kelly Rogers, ATSU’s awesome photographer and he came up with some sweet lighting ideas and various compositions.

I then went to work carving out the W’s from foam-core. Needless to say my foam-core cutting skills aren’t up to par. I first tried carving out a serif W… THAT was a disaster. Then I settled for a sans-serif W. My co-worker/friend/amazing illustrator/foam-core master, Jamie Carroll offered to cut the letters for me. THANK GOODNESS.

I then walked around campus stealing as many magazines as possible to form a huge stack for the photo. The photoshoot took about an hour or so and the only post-processing I did was to remove the stool the magazines were sitting on and to make the ‘WWW.’ pure black/white and not tinted pink (since the foam was pink.)

iconnect magazine advertisement

I recently designed this advertisement for placement in the A. T. Still University alumni magazine. It’s pretty cool to come full circle with a project. I had designed the iconnect website (see this post) and now print advertising for it. I also designed the first ever website for the alumni magazine – Still Magazine. More on that to come later.

from left - Home Storage Solutions magazine cover, 'Stack Your Storage' magazine spread, Table of Contents

from left – Home Storage Solutions magazine cover, ‘Stack Your Storage’ magazine spread, Table of Contents

A few days ago I received a package in the mail. The package was from Dave Stone at Workbench Magazine. It contained the magazine that I spent all summer conceptualizing, branding, designing and redesigning. I had so much anticipation during the past 4 months about what it would be like to finally get the printed copy of the magazine. If you are a designer, you know the feeling of getting to see your design work finished and printed.

From the beginning of the summer, I sometimes doubted my ability to take on such a large project. After all, it was 100 pages and I was charged with the task of designing and redesigning every article in it. Beyond that I got to come up with an overall brand and style that could be used throughout.

I got to work with the amazing Doug Appleby. He’s an assistant art director at Workbench and a pretty awesome photographer as well. He challenged me to never settle for less. This usually meant designing 15-20 versions of a single magazine spread. I must have learned something, because by the last week of work, when we were putting together the table of contents, it only took about 5 versions – with a few tweaks.

If you want to see a preview of the magazine, check out http://www.woodsmithstore.com/w0901a.html

Check out this blog post – “An Amazing Summer So Far“. It was when I first started my internship at August Home Publishing.

Two weeks ago I began an internship at August Home Publishing. I think I’ve learned more about layout and design in the past two weeks than I have in the past two years. Doug Appleby is the Assistant Art Director for Workbench magazine. He is the greatest designer I’ve ever worked with and for. He always knows how to push me to do more with my design, and his ideas never fail to work. Although, unlike professors I’ve had, he doesn’t tell me exactly what to change, he inspires me to see what I do and don’t like and we end up agreeing on what should be changed. Check out his website. He has some great photography.

Workbench magazine is one of five that August Home publishes. It is the only magazine that was not started by August Home, but was bought a few years ago. It is the only one of the woodworking magazines they publish that is changing their target audience to the 25-40, male AND female crowd.

Workbench is different now, because its look and feel is very similar to what you see on TLC. Before this switch in audiences, something like putting type on a vertical path or something on an angle would set people on edge… and I’ve heard that it sometimes still does. But to design for Workbench is to really understand the audience of younger male/females.

Something besides all horizontal text, white-bread photography and cluttered pages is needed to reach this audience. So, white-space, unique info-graphics, and innovative spreads are my best friend this Summer. My job is to redesign about fifteen articles that have been previously published in the past 4-5 years. These will be in a new book coming out in January of home-improvement articles about home storage. I’ve got two articles 90% done.

The design process at Workbench is a push and pull to go further with design and really get in touch with the audience, and also uphold the tradition of the magazines at August Home Publishing. I can’t wait for my first layout meeting with the art directors and the company president. It shall be interesting.

Oh, I also met Senator Obama two days ago. I shook his hand-how cool is that?!?! Check out my photo album from the Obama Rally!